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Classroom Astronomy and Vernier

This is a muon telescope built from Vernier Radiation Monitors. Events that trigger both detectors are located along a line passing through both Geiger tubes.
This is a muon telescope built from Vernier Radiation Monitors. Events that trigger both detectors are located along a line passing through both Geiger tubes.

Detecting Cosmic Rays from Supernovae and Other Catastrophes

There is a great article in The Classroom Astronomer showing how to do coincidence counting using two (or more) of our Vernier Radiation Monitors, some simple circuitry on a breadboard, and a LabQuest 2. They make a muon telescope from two Vernier Radiation Monitors, and experimentally show that muon count rate increases with altitude.

Detecting Cosmic Rays from Supernovae and Other Catastrophes

Using Vernier Sensors to Monitor Light, Temperature and Sky Color During Any Solar Eclipse

There is also another article, “Using Vernier Sensors to Monitor Light, Temperature and Sky Color During Any Solar Eclipse,” by Larry Krumenaker. A group of astronomers and astronomy educators used our LabQuest, temperature sensor, Light Sensor, and SpectoVis Plus to monitor conditions during the annular eclipse on May 20, 2014.

Using Vernier Sensors to Monitor Light, Temperature and Sky Color During Any Solar Eclipse

The editor of The Classroom Astronomer was kind enough to provide the articles online so that interested teachers can read them. Subscriptions to The Classroom Astronomer are available at www.classroomastronomer.com

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