Vernier Software and Technology
Vernier Software & Technology

AP Correlations for Investigating Chemistry through Inquiry

The College Board’s AP* Chemistry Curriculum Framework has undergone significant changes. The new standards will go into effect for the 2013-2014 school year.

Table 1 outlines the correlation of the Primary Learning Objective in the 16 lab investigations from AP® Chemistry Guided-Inquiry Experiments: Applying the Science Practices and the Vernier lab book Investigating Chemistry through Inquiry.

Table 2 correlates Learning Objectives from the new Curriculum Framework to each lab experiment in the Vernier lab book Investigating Chemistry through Inquiry.

Table 1

College Board Vernier Experiment
Lab Primary Learning Objective
1 1.15 11. Beer’s Law Investigations
2 1.16 11. Beer’s Law Investigations
4 1.20 17. Acid-Base Titrations
8 3.9 19. Oxidation-Reduction Titrations
9 3.10 5. Identifying a Pure Substance
10 4.1 22. Reaction Rates
11 4.2 22. Reaction Rates
12 5.7 6. Investigating the Energy Content of Foods
7. Investigating the Energy Content of Fuels
14 6.13 17. Acid-Base Titrations
15 6.20 16. The Effect of Acid Deposition on Aqueous Systems
21. Baking Soda and Vinegar Investigations Revisited
16 6.18 16. The Effect of Acid Deposition on Aqueous Systems

Table 2

Vernier Experiment Learning Objective from the AP Chemistry 2013 Framework
1. Physical Properties of Water (No match to a Learning Objective)
2. Baking Soda and Vinegar Investigations (No match to a Learning Objective)
3. An Investigation of Urea-Containing Cold Packs 5.7: The student is able to design and/or interpret the results of an experiment in which calorimetry is used to determine the change in enthalpy of a chemical process (heating/cooling, phase transition, or chemical reaction) at constant pressure.
4. Conductivity of Aqueous Solutions 2.15: The student is able to explain observations regarding the solubility of ionic solids and molecules in water and other solvents on the basis of particle views that include intermolecular interactions and entropic effects.
5. Identifying a Pure Substance 3.10: The student is able to evaluate the classification of a process as a physical change, chemical change, or ambiguous change based on both macroscopic observations and the distinction between rearrangement of covalent interactions and noncovalent interactions.
6. Investigating the Energy Content of Foods 3.11: The student is able to interpret observations regarding macroscopic energy changes associated with a reaction or process to generate a relevant symbolic and/or graphical representation of the energy changes.
5.7: The student is able to design and/or interpret the results of an experiment in which calorimetry is used to determine the change in enthalpy of a chemical process (heating/cooling, phase transition, or chemical reaction) at constant pressure.
7. Investigating the Energy Content of Fuels 3.11: The student is able to interpret observations regarding macroscopic energy changes associated with a reaction or process to generate a relevant symbolic and/or graphical representation of the energy changes.
5.7: The student is able to design and/or interpret the results of an experiment in which calorimetry is used to determine the change in enthalpy of a chemical process (heating/cooling, phase transition, or chemical reaction) at constant pressure.
8. Evaporation and Intermolecular Attractions 2.16: The student is able to explain the properties (phase, vapor pressure, viscosity, etc.) of small and large molecular compounds in terms of the strengths and types of intermolecular forces.
9. Enthalpy Changes 5.8: The student is able to draw qualitative and quantitative connections between the reaction enthalpy and the energies involved in the breaking and formation of chemical bonds.
10. Reaction Stoichiometry 3.4: The student is able to relate quantities (measured mass of substances, volumes of solutions, or volumes and pressures of gases) to identify stoichiometric relationships for a reaction, including situations involving limiting reactants and situations in which the reaction has not gone to completion.
11. Beer’s Law Investigations 1.15 The student can justify the selection of a particular type of spectroscopy to measure properties associated with vibrational or electronic motions of molecules.
1.16: The student can design and/or interpret the results of an experiment regarding the absorption of light to determine the concentration of an absorbing species in a solution.
12. Colligative Properties of Solutions (Removed from the AP Chemistry curriculum)
13. Long Term Water Monitoring (No match to a Learning Objective)
14. Vapor Pressure and Heat of Vaporization Investigations 5.6: The student is able to use calculations or estimations to relate energy changes associated with heating/cooling a substance to the heat capacity, relate energy changes associated with a phase transition to the enthalpy of fusion/vaporization, relate energy changes associated with a chemical reaction to the enthalpy of the reaction, and relate energy changes to PΔV work.
15. Acid-Base Properties of Household Products 1.20: The student can design, and/or interpret data from, an experiment that uses titration to determine the concentration of an analyte in a solution. (var.)
16. The Effect of Acid Deposition on Aqueous Systems 6.18 The student can design a buffer solution with a target pH and buffer capacity by selecting an appropriate conjugate acid-base pair and estimating the concentrations needed to achieve the desired capacity.
6.20: The student can identify a solution as being a buffer solution and explain the buffer mechanism in terms of the reactions that would occur on addition of acid or base.
17. Acid-Base Titrations 1.20: The student can design, and/or interpret data from, an experiment that uses titration to determine the concentration of an analyte in a solution., 6.13: The student can interpret titration data for monoprotic or polyprotic acids involving titration of a weak or strong acid by a strong base (or a weak or strong base by a strong acid) to determine the concentration of the titrant and the pKa for a weak acid, or the pKb for a weak base.
18. Conductimetric Titrations 1.20: The student can design, and/or interpret data from, an experiment that uses titration to determine the concentration of an analyte in a solution.
19. Oxidation-Reduction Titrations 1.20: The student can design, and/or interpret data from, an experiment that uses titration to determine the concentration of an analyte in a solution.
3.9: The student is able to design and/or interpret the results of an experiment involving a redox titration.
20. Investigating Voltaic Cells 3.13: The student can analyze data regarding galvanic or electrolytic cells to identify properties of the underlying redox reactions.
21. Baking Soda and Vinegar Investigations Revisited 5.8: The student is able to draw qualitative and quantitative connections between the reaction enthalpy and the energies involved in the breaking and formation of chemical bonds.
6.13: The student can interpret titration data for monoprotic or polyprotic acids involving titration of a weak or strong acid by a strong base (or a weak or strong base by a strong acid) to determine the concentration of the titrant and the pKa for a weak acid, or the pKb for a weak base.
6.20: The student can identify a solution as being a buffer solution and explain the buffer mechanism in terms of the reactions that would occur on addition of acid or base.
22. Reaction Rates 4.1: The student is able to design and/or interpret the results of an experiment regarding the factors (i.e., temperature, concentration, surface area) that may influence the rate of a reaction.
4.2: The student is able to analyze concentration vs. time data to determine the rate law for a zeroth-, first-, or second-order reaction.
23. Enzyme Activity 4.8: The student can translate among reaction energy profile representations, particulate representations, and symbolic representations (chemical equations) of a chemical reaction occurring in the presence and absence of a catalyst.
4.9: The student can explain changes in reaction rates arising from the use of acid-base catalysts, surface catalysts, or enzyme catalysts, including selecting appropriate mechanisms with or without the catalyst present.
24. Sugar Fermentation by Yeast (No match to a Learning Objective)
25. Nuclear Radiation (No match to a Learning Objective)

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