Vernier Software and Technology
Vernier Software & Technology

AP Correlations for Advanced Physics with Vernier – Mechanics

We have correlated experiments in Advanced Physics with Vernier – Mechanics to the course content in the Acorn booklet.

Beginning with courses offered in the 2014-2015 school year, the College Board’s AP* Physics Curriculum Framework will shift from a more traditional content-based model to one that focuses on seven Big Ideas, the Enduring Understandings comprised of the major concepts under each Big Idea, and the Essential Knowledge necessary to support these concepts. Science Practices are emphasized throughout the course.

See products recommended for AP Physics 1 or 2 or AP Physics C.

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Table 1 Correlation of Advanced Physics with Vernier – Mechanics to the AP Physics 1 and 2 Curriculum Framework
Investigation Number Investigation Name Big Idea Enduring Understanding Essential Knowledge
1 Motion on an Incline 3 3A 3A1
2 Error Analysis 1, 2, 3 1C, 2A, 3A 1C2, 2A1, 3A1
3 Newton’s First Law 3 3A, 3C 3A1, 3C4
4 Newton’s Second Law 3 3A, 3B 3A1, 3A2, 3A3, 3B1
5 Newton’s Third Law 3 3A, 3B 3A2, 3A3, 3A4, 3B1
6 Projectile Motion 3 3A 3A1
7 Energy Storage and Transfer: Elastic Energy 4, 5 4C, 5A, 5B 4C1, 4C2, 5A2, 5B5
8 Energy Storage and Transfer: Kinetic Energy 4, 5 4C, 5A, 5B 4C1, 4C2, 5A2, 5B1, 5B4, 5B5
9 Energy Storage and Transfer: Gravitational Energy 4 4C, 5A, 5B 4C1, 4C2, 5A2, 5B1, 5B4, 5B5
10 Impulse and Momentum 3, 5 3D, 5A 3D1, 3D2, 5A2
11 Momentum and Collisions 3, 5 3D, 5A, 5D 3D1, 3D2, 5A2, 5D1, 5D2
12 Centripetal Acceleration 3, 4 3A, 4A 3A1, 3A2, 4A1, 4A2
13 Rotational Dynamics 3, 4 3F, 4D 3F1, 3F2, 4D1
14 Conservation of Angular Momentum 3, 4, 5 3F, 4D, 5E 3F1, 3F2, 3F3, 4D1, 4D2, 4D3, 5E1, 5E2
15 Simple Harmonic Motion: Mathematical Model 3, 5, 6 3B, 5B, 6A, 6B 3B3, 5B2, 6A3, 6B1, 6B3
16 Simple Harmonic Motion: Kinematics and Dynamics 3, 5, 6 3B, 5B, 6A, 6B 3B3, 5B2, 6A3, 6B1, 6B3
17 Pendulum Periods 3 3B 3B3
18 Physical Pendulum 3 3B, 3F 3B3, 3F2
19 Center of Mass 1, 4, 5 1,A 4A, 4B, 5D 1A1, 4A1, 4A2, 4A3, 4B1, 4B2, 5D3
Table 2 Correlation of the AP Physics 1 and 2 Big Ideas to Advanced Physics with Vernier – Mechanics
AP Physics 1 and 2 Big Ideas Advanced Physics with Vernier – Mechanics Investigations
1 Objects and systems have properties such as mass and charge Systems may have internal structure. 2, 19
2 Fields Existing in space can be used to explain interactions. 2
3 The interactions of an object with other objects can be described by forces. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18
4 Interactions between systems can result in changes in those systems. 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 19
5 Changes that occur as a result of interactions are constrained by conservation laws. 7, 8, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, 19
6 Waves can transfer energy and momentum from one location to another without the permanent transfer of mass and serve as a mathematical model for the description of other phenomena. 15, 16
7 The mathematics of probability can be used to describe the behavior of complex systems and to interpret the behavior of quantum mechanical systems.
Table 3 Correlation of the AP Physics 1 and 2 Science Practices to Advanced Physics with Vernier – Mechanics
Science Practices for AP Physics 1 and 2 Advanced Physics with Vernier – Mechanics
Science Practice 1: The student can use representations and models to communicate scientific phenomena and solve scientific problems.
  • 1.1 The student can create representations and models of natural or human-made phenomena and systems in the domain.
  • 1.2 The student can describe representations and models of natural or man-made phenomena and systems in the domain.
  • 1.3 The student can refine representations and models of natural or man-made phenomena and systems in the domain.
  • 1.4 The student can use representations and models to analyze situations or solve problems qualitatively and quantitatively.
  • 1.5 The student can reexpress key elements of natural phenomena across multiple representations in the domain.
Pre-Lab Investigations
  • Each experiment contains Pre-Lab Investigations, which provide opportunities for students to represent their knowledge related to the investigations. Often these include representations and models, which the students use to show their prior understanding of the subject in the investigation. An example would be sketching graphs of motion presented by the question.
Evaluation of Data
  • As the students complete their investigation, they will be analyzing the problem and refining their models or representations.
Extensions
  • As the investigation is carried out, students will continue to use and refine their models. The extensions provide opportunities for students to apply their revisions beyond the investigation.
Science Practice 2: The student can use mathematics appropriately.
  • 2.1 The student can justify the selection of a mathematical routine to solve problems.
  • 2.2 The student can apply mathematical routines to quantities that describe natural phenomena.
  • 2.3 The student can estimate numerically quantities that describe natural phenomena.
Pre-Lab Investigation
  • Each activity includes a Pre-Lab Investigation, which guide students’ thinking and analysis, including an application of mathematics. An example would be evaluating graphs of motion or energy change.
Procedure
  • The data collection process often includes calculations such as determining the impulse that causes a change in an objects momentum.
Evaluation of Data
  • Data analysis almost always includes mathematics. Calculating the change in momentum and energy during collisions is one example.
Extensions
  • Going beyond the investigation procedure usually includes some additional calculations with different masses, velocities, etc. Calculating the speed of sound in different gases or temperatures is an example.
Science Practice 3: The student can engage in scientific questioning to extend thinking or to guide investigations within the context of the AP course.
  • 3.1 The student can pose scientific questions.
  • 3.2 The student can refine scientific questions.
  • 3.3 The student can evaluate scientific questions.
Evaluation of Data
  • Once students have completed data collection they are directed to evaluate the question based on the data collected.
Extensions
  • During the planning process or completion of an extension, the questions are often refined as students learn more about their topic and begin to think through the logistics of actual research. Many times there are extensions that ask students to develop a question and investigation that goes beyond the current experiment.
Summarizing the Results
  • As students summarize their results, they evaluate their own and the investigations questions.
Science Practice 4: The student can plan and implement data collection strategies appropriate to a particular scientific question.
  • 4.1 The student can justify the selection of the kind of data needed to answer a particular scientific question.
  • 4.2 The student can design a plan for collecting data to answer a particular scientific question.
  • 4.3 The student can collect data to answer a particular scientific question.
  • 4.4 The student can evaluate sources of data to answer a particular scientific question.
Procedure
  • During the procedure, the students will evaluate their data to determine if it is representative of the concept being studied.
Optional Approaches
  • Teachers can edit any of the experiment files so students have to design their own procedures and determine what data is necessary to complete the task at hand.
Student Designed Investigation
  • During the planning process, the students will determine what data they want to collect. Evaluating other sources of data can be helpful in this step.
  • Students will then select which tools are needed to collect data and develop a procedure to carry out their test.
Carrying out the Procedure
  • Students carry out the procedure and collect their data.
Organizing the Data
  • As students organize their own data, they may choose to evaluate data from other sources as well to help answer their particular question.
Science Practice 5: The student can perform data analysis and evaluation of evidence.
  • 5.1 The student can analyze data to identify patterns or relationships.
  • 5.2 The student can refine observations and measurements based on data analysis.
  • 5.3 The student can evaluate the evidence provided by data sets in relation to a particular scientific question.
Pre-Lab Investigations
  • Data analysis and evaluation of evidence occurs in at least two places in every investigation. In the Pre-Lab Investigations students answer questions to identify initial patterns or relationships.
Procedure
  • As the investigation is being carried out, students will need to refine and evaluate their observations as they go.
Evaluation of Data
  • Once the data collection is complete, students will evaluate the evidence provided by their data.
Science Practice 6: The student can work with scientific explanations and theories.
  • 6.1 The student can justify claims with evidence.
  • 6.2 The student can construct explanations of phenomena based on evidence produced through scientific practices.
  • 6.3 The student can articulate the reasons that scientific explanations and theories are refined or replaced.
  • 6.4 The student can make claims and predictions about natural phenomena based on scientific theories and models.
  • 6.5 The student can evaluate alternative scientific explanations.
Evaluation of Data
  • In the Evaluation phase of these investigations, students analyze their results in order to construct an explanation or claim.
  • Students use their data and its analysis to justify these claims.
Summarizing the Results
  • As students summarize their results, they articulate their claims based on the data.
  • Often, students in other groups will arrive at different conclusions. This is an excellent opportunity to evaluate alternative scientific explanations for seemingly conflicting results.
Science Practice 7: The student is able to connect and relate knowledge across various scales, concepts and representations in and across domains.
  • 7.1 The student can connect phenomena and models across spatial and temporal scales.
  • 7.2 The student can connect concepts in and across domain(s) to generalize or extrapolate in and/or across enduring understandings and/or big ideas.
Pre-Lab Investigations
  • Pre-Lab Investigations introduce students to the phenomena in question. From this basis, coupled with the investigation to follow, students can begin to make connections across special and temporal scales.
Evaluation of Data
  • During analysis, students must bring together not only their data, but their prior knowledge of various phenomena and models and put it into context to connect the concepts.
Extensions
  • This phase of the investigation forces students to think about the connections, and in what directions they can go to understand something new about the concept they are studying.
  • As the students plan extension investigations, they must begin to make connections to other disciplines and think about how scale and time are important factors.
Summarizing the Results
  • Having to articulate their results forces students to relate the knowledge, how it fits into the big ideas, and its connections to other disciplines in a clear and concise manner.

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