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Join 100 Million Students in Hour of Code

“Computer science empowers students to create the world of tomorrow.
– Satya Nadella, Microsoft CEO

What is Hour of Code?

The Hour of Code is a global movement introducing tens of millions of students worldwide to computer science, inspiring kids to learn more, breaking stereotypes, and leaving them feeling empowered. The Hour of Code began as a one-hour coding challenge to give students a fun first introduction to computer science and has become a global learning event, celebration, and awareness event.

Why computer science?

Computer science is foundational and is changing every industry on the planet. Every 21st-century student should have the opportunity to learn how to create technology. Computer science concepts also help nurture creativity and problem-solving skills to prepare students for any future career.

Economic Opportunity for All

Computing occupations are the fastest-growing, best paying, and now the largest sector of all new wages in the US. Every child deserves the opportunity to succeed.

The value of a computer science education

Students love it!

Recent surveys show that among classes students “like a lot,” computer science and engineering rank near the top—only performing arts, art, and design are higher.

Students like computer science and engineering

Vernier offers coding activities appropriate to introduce your entry-level coders to block-based languages like Scratch and LEGO® MINDSTORMS®. We also offer activities for intermediate-level coders utilizing Python® or JavaScript. For applications that require test, measurement, and control with rapid access to hardware and data insights, Vernier sensors are supported in advanced languages like LabVIEW and Arduino®.

Ready to participate with your class?

We’ve created two free coding activities utilizing Scratch to help you and your students participate in Hour of Code this year. Scratch offers colorful and modularized drag-and-drop graphical blocks that make it easy for programmers to code.

Hour of Code Activity for Entry Level Coders

In this activity students program a catch game where they can make choices on graphics and game options. The free Scratch software works on your web-connected device.

If you have an Low-g Accelerometer in your classroom, our free activity guide integrates the sensor into the Catch Game activity and your students learn how to integrate their code with hardware.

Download the Vernier Catch activity for Scratch

The Catch Game can also be completed by any classroom with no sensors needed.

Explore the Catch activity in Scratch

Hour of Code Activity for Advanced Coders

For more advanced coders, this activity combines Scratch-based coding and exploration of the ideal gas laws. Students can change multiple variables and observe changes. Results can be compared with their calculations.

Download the Ideal Gas Law Exploration activity with instructors guide

Explore the Ideal Gas Law Exploration activity in Scratch

The ‘Hour of Code™’ is a nationwide initiative by Computer Science Education Week [csedweek.org] and Code.org [code.org] to introduce millions of students to one hour of computer science and computer programming.

SDS vs. MSDS

Dr. Elaine Nam holding up MSDS and SDS papers

What is an SDS?

A Safety Data Sheet (SDS) serves the same purpose as a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). They provide a formal and consistent format, in 16 sections, that are organized in a specific order to make them easy for people to understand. The SDS also follows the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS).

What is the difference between an MSDS and SDS?

While the MSDS came in multiple forms, the SDS is presented in one format. Many MSDS components can be found in an SDS. New sections and types of information have been added to make SDS more useful. To be categorized as a Safety Data Sheet, it must include all 16 of the required sections and conform to the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). That format consists of a specific order and set of headlines. The OSHA® QuickCard lists the 16 sections.

What is GHS?

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS) is a set of international guidelines developed by the United Nations. These guidelines were created to ensure the safe manufacturing, handling, use, disposal, and transport of hazardous materials. Their goals are

  1. Define health, physical, and environmental hazards of chemicals.
  2. Create classification processes that use available data on chemicals for comparison with the defined hazard criteria.
  3. Communicate hazard information, as well as protective measures, on labels and Safety Data Sheets (SDS).

Does Vernier provide an SDS?

Yes. An SDS is provided for each chemical that we ship. In 2015, Vernier adopted the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). All of our MSDS have been updated to an SDS. The Safety Data Sheet for chemicals and solutions sold by Vernier can be found on each product’s web page and in our Product Manuals and Reference Guides.

Demystifying Ion-Selective Electrodes

Vernier Go Direct ISEs

Traditionally visual techniques are used to measure the concentration of ions in solution. Concentration is determined by comparing colors of solutions with charts and tables. Vernier ion-selective electrodes (ISEs), offer a much easier and more reliable method to measure ammonium, calcium, chloride, nitrate, and potassium ions in solution. By adhering to a few best practices, students can consistently get good data with our ion-selective electrodes.

Common customer questions about the use of ion-selective electrodes.

1. My ion-selective electrode is not reading correctly or will not calibrate.

The most common reason for this is the age of the module in the electrode. All of our ion-selective electrodes have replaceable modules, with the exception the chloride electrode.

Go Direct Nitrate ISE module

To replace the module, carefully, unscrew the end of the electrode and extract the module from the body. The replaceable module will have a date stamped on the side. The modules are warranted for 1 year past the date of purchase. Under typical classroom use, you should expect to replace the module after a year. For this reason, we recommend purchasing modules as close to the time you will use them as possible.

The chloride specific electrode uses a solid state membrane that does not need to be replaced with time. However, the response of this electrode may slow with use. Cut a 1 in2 piece of the polishing strip that came with the electrode, Thoroughly wet the dull side of the polishing strip and electrode with distilled water. Gently polish the end of the electrode to remove accumulated material that is impeding the performance. Rinse the electrode with distilled water and calibrate it.

Replacement modules can be found on our Replacements and Accessories web page.

2. My ion-selective electrode loses its calibration right after I calibrate it.

Other than age, the most common reason for an ISE to lose its calibration right away is that the calibration data was not saved to the memory of the sensor.

LabQuest ISEs

When collecting data with LabQuest ISEs (those with a white, plastic BTA connector), you can store the calibration to the sensor itself. After the calibration procedure, look for the Storage tab in the software. Click or tap the Storage tab, and select the option to “Save the Calibration to the Sensor” or “Set Sensor Calibration.” This will ensure that, after the sensor is disconnected, the most recent calibration will load automatically when the sensor is used again—even if connected to a different LabQuest or computer. For more information about calibrating and storing calibrations with various sensors and interfaces, visit How do I calibrate my sensor? Note: When collecting data with LabQuest ISEs and Graphical Analysis 4, the calibration cannot presently be stored; calibrate your ISEs each time you use them.

Go Direct ISEs

When using Go Direct ISEs and Graphical Analysis 4 app, the calibration information is automatically stored in the the memory of the sensor; there is no need to do additional steps to store the calibration.

3. My ISE is reading off from the calibration standards, even right after I calibrate it.

The response time of ISEs is much slower than most of our other sensors. This means that both the calibration and data collection must be done slowly and consistently:

  1. Make sure to soak your ISE in the high standard solution for at least 30 minutes before calibrating.
  2. When performing the calibration wait at least 90 seconds to 2 minutes in each standard solution before keeping the calibration point.
  3. When using the sensor to read the concentration of an ion in solution, make sure to wait the same amount of time you did when you calibrated the probe.

Vernier Ion-Selective Electrodes can offer another way to enhance your chemistry and water quality studies. With a little foreknowledge you will be able to do some interesting experiments with these sensors.

For more tips on using Vernier ion-selective electrodes, see General tips for using Ion Selective Electrodes (ISE).

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