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Vernier in the Physics Journals (Spring 2019)

  • Improved Gay-Lussac Experiment Considering Added Volumes

    Nelson Kilmer and Joel D. Krehbiel (Hesston College, Kansas);
    The Physics Teacher, 57, January, 2019, pp 21-25.

    Pressure sensors are often used to estimate absolute zero. This article explains how to improve the result if you account for the air that is inside both the tubing and the sensor.

  • Using a Modified Boyle’s Law Experiment to Estimate the Density of Salts

    Joel D. Krehbiel, Kenton N. Schroeder, Harune Suzuki, and Nelson Kilmer (Hesston College, Kansas);
    The Physics Teacher, 57, January, 2019, pp 58-59.

    This article explains how to use Boyle’s law to easily measure volume using Vernier pressure sensors.

  • Adding Math to Science

    Drew Nelson (Logan HS, Logan, UT) and Todd Campbell (University of Connecticut, Connecticut);
    The Science Teacher, October, 2018, pp 26-32.

    This article describes a multiple-day unit on friction in which the students take force data, make graphs, and use models that demonstrate several NGSS standards.

  • A Mystery in Motion

    Amy Choffin and Laura Johnson (Northern Hills Elementary School, Oklahoma);
    Science and Children, July, 2018, page 56.

    This article explains how grade school teachers introduce their students to sensors, graphing, and motion while using our Go!Motion sensor.

Vernier Supports STREAM Girls

STREAM Girls, a new outdoor STEM program for girls, is a partnership between Trout Unlimited and the Girl Scouts of America. Using water quality testing equipment donated by Vernier Software & Technology, this watershed experience combines STEM education, recreation, and arts to explore a local stream.

Every person is a citizen of her watershed, and by visiting a local stream and having the opportunity to observe it as scientists, anglers, and artists, girls get the complete picture of what their stream could mean to them. Beyond science, Scouts were introduced to fly fishing, camping, conservation, and outdoor ecology. Trout Unlimited and the Girl Scouts of America hope to continue to inspire new leaders that will steward and conserve our country’s precious natural resources.

Group of girls posing in a stream with their notebooks

Girls recording observations on their notebooks about the stream

Girl identifying an insect in a spoon with a reference guide

Photos courtesy of Trout Unlimited

Explore Stokes Shift with Spectral Analysis®

Graph from Spectral Analysis software showing absorbance and fluorescence spectrum of vitamin B2
Absorbance and fluorescence spectrum of vitamin B2

We’re “stoked” about the addition of fluorescence to the latest version of Spectral Analysis. It allows students to see the Stokes shift between the absorption and emission spectra. Download our free experiment “Absorbance and Fluorescence Characterization of Vitamin B2” for use with our free Spectral Analysis app and our fluorescence spectrometers.

Explore Stokes Shift with Riboflavin »

Four Ways to Get K-8 Students Excited About Science

by Nüsret Hisim

Nüsret Hisim is an Education Technology Specialist at Vernier and a former science teacher. He’ll be hosting a webinar, Using Technology to Excite Students About Hands-On Science on March 5th.

Students studying the freezing and melting of water with Go Direct Temperature

It can be challenging to engage students in science activities, despite how exciting the lessons are. As an Education Technology Specialist at Vernier Software & Technology, I frequently receive phone calls and inquiries from elementary and middle school teachers looking for ways to engage their students with hands-on science experiments. Teachers are tasked with teaching an array of subjects, and as a result, many find themselves teaching science despite not having the experience to describe complicated and seemingly intimidating concepts in an effective and stimulating way. After years of attending and conducting workshops with teachers of all levels, and being a former science teacher myself, I know this to be an especially significant challenge for teachers.

First and foremost, when it comes to getting students excited about science, it’s important to make sure science is hands on. Sometimes teachers have all the materials but don’t have the knowledge to explain the science behind the experiments. Some teachers struggle to find the time to set up investigations that are both effective and engaging.

Regardless of the issue, I have four simple methods I’d love to share that will help you get your students truly excited about science while keeping you sane.

1. Ask questions to involve students and keep them interested.

The best way to get students thinking like real scientists is to treat them like real scientists. By asking your students questions about science phenomena, simple observable events that drive student inquiry, and the concepts behind them, you can awaken prior knowledge and get students more involved in making observations, predictions, and hypotheses. With their attention fully engaged, you can apply their prior knowledge to a different reaction/phenomenon that students are less familiar with—extending this knowledge into new areas. By encouraging students to use existing knowledge for new discoveries, you help build student interest and motivation to find answers.

2. Learn alongside your students.

Show your students the fun of science experimentation by demonstrating your own interest and curiosity. You don’t have to be an expert to learn alongside your students, so dive in! Become involved by asking your own questions, taking part in investigations, and engaging in interactive feedback. When students see that you’re engaged in an investigation, their curiosity is piqued and they want to be engaged as well.

3. Save time with easy experiment setup and quick results.

Money can be hard to come by in schools; big experiments with delicate tools and complicated setups are often expensive and cumbersome, making them impractical for the classroom. One way to ease this burden is to simplify your roster of investigations and the tools used to conduct them. Instead of dealing with expensive and difficult equipment, invest in products that are cost effective, durable, east to set up, and designed with students in mind. Find tools that work with technology you already have in your classroom.

4. Make it a cross-curricular event.

Demonstrate to students that science exists in all aspects of their lives by overlapping other school subjects into discussions and investigations. Have them write ‘professional’ hypotheses; for instance, to practice writing—find a curve fit for their data to apply math concepts—or try exploring the history behind different science concepts to incorporate social studies. Whichever subject you choose to cross, have fun with it and use your creativity! This cross-curricular approach is not only a powerful way to stress the connection between subjects, but it’s exciting for students to better understand science in a real-world capacity.

With these four methods you’ll see more engagement from your students regardless of your prior experience teaching science. By asking questions, learning alongside your students, investing in products that help you save time, and doing experiments that can incorporate other subject areas, you’re sure to get your students excited about science.


At Vernier, we strive to equip teachers to not only teach science but to teach it in the most engaging way possible. If you’re looking for more ideas on how to engage students in the classroom, join Nüs for a webinar where he’ll discuss this as well as other cognitive teaching strategies and the impact of the hands-on approach to science. Watch as he uses a temperature probe to measure temperature changes during an experiment involving a reaction between common household products.

Register Here »

Nusret Hisim

How to Introduce Evolution to Your Students

By Sara Tallarovic

Darwin Day is coming up on Wednesday, February 12th. It presents an excellent opportunity to introduce or discuss the concept of evolution by natural selection with your students. While I’m now part of the Vernier Biology Department, I previously worked for 15 years as a university biology professor and know first hand how creative teachers have to get when introducing new concepts to a classroom of students. There are plenty of ways to get students excited about evolution, and here are a few ideas.

Introducing Evolution with Candy

Hands-on activities easily engage students, and when I was teaching biology, one of my favorite ways to introduce evolution was with a candy hunt. You can find multiple versions of this exercise online using different types of candies, but I like mixing together a bag of plain M&M’s® (the original kind with six colors) and several bags of candy corn (the original yellow, orange, and white type) in a large shallow bowl or tub. I pass it around and ask students to select a number of M&M’s® but not to eat them. You can vary the number they choose to match your class size.

Once the candy circulates around the entire room, we count how many of each color of M&M’s® were selected and graph it on the board. The results are always striking. Very few of the yellow and orange M&M’s® are typically selected, while more contrasting colors, especially blue and green, are selected in higher proportions.

Right away, students can begin picturing the forces at work in the natural world. We then talk about the variation of our “population” of M&M’s® and how some “individuals” might have a selective advantage by blending in with the substrate (candy corn) whereas others were easier for their “predators” to spot. The exercise makes a fun prelude to a more in-depth lesson on evolution and natural selection.

Deepening Student Understanding of Evolution

I found that incorporating a variety of interactive and informative activities resonated with my students. After introducing the concept of evolution through the candy hunt, I used a mixture of short videos and hands-on experiments. If you enjoy sharing media with your class, you can also browse HHMI BioInteractive’s evolution collection, where you can find a wealth of free activities and short films.

One of my favorite films is The Making of a Theory: Darwin, Wallace and Natural Selection. This half hour piece presents a compelling history lesson, telling the stories of both Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace, which helps students visualize the physical and intellectual journeys that led these two men to the discovery of evolution and natural selection.

If you are more interested in the mechanics of evolution than the history of its discovery, my colleague and former high school biology teacher, Colleen, recommends The Making of the Fittest: Adaptation and Natural Selection, which is a 10 minute film about the evolution of rock pocket mice.

How Vernier Can Help

Whether your lesson plan includes activities like the candy hunt, videos, or other approaches, engaging students through evolution-themed laboratory activities are highly effective, and Vernier has multiple experiments to fit your class. Our inquiry-based laboratory experiments include exploring the evolution of yeast, comparing the respiratory systems of different aquatic organisms, and many more. You can access more information about these experiments here.

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