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NSTA Blog Reviews Go Direct® Motion Detector

Go Direct Motion Detector

NSTA Recommends recently featured the Go Direct® Motion Detector in the article, “The Vernier Go Direct Motion Detector: A Modern Twist on a Timeless Design,” Reviewer Martin Horejsi provides interesting background and history on ultrasonic motion detectors before highlighting the “mid-21st century finesse and rigor,” features, and overall functionality of the Go Direct® Motion Detector.

In the review, Martin says:

“The mobility of the Vernier Go Direct® Motion Detector opens up new channels of scientific inspection. Of course there is the highly accurate and fast motion detection, but there is also the ability to easily navigate materials and angles, and interference, and most anything else one can think of at the intersection of the Vernier Go Direct® Motion Detector and sound material science (pun intended).”

And, he concludes by saying:

“The word echo, by the way, stems from the story in Greek mythology about a cursed nymph who was doomed to only repeat the last words anyone spoke to her. My guess is today’s students will echo each other when using the Vernier Go Direct® Motion Detector by repeating single words over and over like, “Cool” and “Wow!””

The complete Go Direct family of sensors offers teachers and students maximum versatility to collect scientific data either wirelessly or via a USB connection. These low-cost sensors can be used in more than 300 teacher-tested experiments developed by Vernier and are supported by free graphing and analysis software, the Graphical Analysis™ 4 app.

Read more about the Go Direct Motion Detector on NSTA Recommends»

Go Direct® Sensors Receive Outstanding Review

The Vernier Go Direct family of sensors recently received an ‘Outstanding’ review from The EdTech Roundup. In the article, “Vernier Go Direct Sensors: Collect Data Wirelessly in the K-12 Science Classroom,” editor Mike Karlin discusses the sensors’ wireless functionality, durability, and ease of use. He specifically highlights the Go Direct Force and Acceleration Sensor, saying:

“Just like Vernier’s previous generations of sensors, I found the force and acceleration sensor to be sturdy, and well-built. They’re definitely ready to stand up to life in the classroom.”

He concludes the review by saying:

“Overall, I think Vernier has built a solid line of sensors that are well-suited for the modern, 1:1 classroom. Students can easily collect data, regardless of the type of device they’re using. Plus, Vernier’s collection of standards-aligned lesson plans offers teachers great ideas for how to integrate these probes and experiments into the classroom.”

The Go Direct® Force and Acceleration Sensor couples a 3-axis accelerometer with a stable and accurate force sensor that measures forces as small as ±0.1 N and up to ±50 N. Students can use the sensor to measure pushes and pulls during investigations in the classroom and out in the field.

Go Direct sensors offer teachers and students maximum versatility to collect scientific data either wirelessly or via a USB connection. These Go Direct sensors for chemistry, biology, physics, and more can be used in hundreds of teacher-tested experiments developed by Vernier and are supported by free graphing and analysis software, the Graphical Analysis™ 4 app.

Read more about the Go Direct sensors on The EdTech Roundup »

NSTA Blog Reviews Go Direct 3-Axis Magnetic Field Sensor

The NSTA Blog recently highlighted the Vernier Go Direct 3-Axis Magnetic Field Sensor in the article, “The Vernier Three-Axis Magnetic Field Sensor: A Magic Wand for Magnets.” Reviewer Martin Horejsi discusses the sensor’s benefits for science classrooms and calls it “a breakthrough in capability, size, weight, price, and most important performance.”

He concludes the review by saying:

“Conducting experiments and inspections with magnets is as easy as waving your magic wand. Don’t have a magic wand? Then use the next best thing, a Go Direct Vernier Three-Axis Magnetic Field Sensor.”

The Go Direct 3-Axis Magnetic Field Sensor measures the components of the magnetic field along three orthogonal axes. This allows students to determine the magnitude and direction of the magnetic field at any point in space. Students can also measure the field along only two axes, or even one axis, choosing the direction that is best for the experiment.

The Go Direct family of sensors offers teachers and students maximum versatility to collect scientific data either wirelessly or via a USB connection. The 16 low-cost sensors, which are designed primarily for chemistry, physical science, and middle school science, can be used in more than 190 teacher-tested experiments developed by Vernier and are supported by free graphing and analysis software, the Graphical Analysis™ 4 app.

Read more about the Go Direct 3-Axis Magnetic Field Sensor on the NSTA Blog »

LabQuest Stream Receives Rave Review in NSTA Blog

The NSTA Blog published a helpful review of LabQuest Stream. In the article, titled “The Vernier LabQuest Stream: The Absolute Hub of Discovery,” reviewer Martin Horejsi discusses the interface’s extensive list of features, connectivity options, and how the device is “truly a hub of discovery.” He concludes by saying:

“. . . let me just say that even though I have used all their interfaces since nineteen-ninety something, this is the most exciting thing since the personal computing power of the device-in-hand was harnessed (which is hugely powerful, by the way, Hugely!.)”

The LabQuest Stream is a wireless and USB sensor interface that expands data-collection possibilities in science and STEM classrooms by allowing students to collect scientific data from multiple sensors with a mobile device, Chromebook, or computer. Its five sensor ports are compatible with a wide array of Vernier standard sensors, and students can conduct a variety of multi-variable experiments and data-logging labs.

Students can use LabQuest Stream with the Vernier Graphical Analysis app, Logger Pro 3, and Logger Lite software to collect and analyze up to 10,000 samples per second using wireless functionality or up to 100,000 samples per second when using USB connectivity.

Read the complete review of the LabQuest Stream on the NSTA Blog »

Thermal Analysis App Featured in NSTA Blog

NSTA recently reviewed the FLIR ONE Thermal Imaging Camera and the Thermal Analysis for FLIR ONE app developed by Vernier. In the review, Edwin Christmann discusses the functionality and features of both the camera and the app and how they provide students with an engaging, hands-on way to study thermodynamics. He says:

“The Thermal camera, in conjunction with the Thermal Analysis app, can do much more than simply detect heat. Students will also be able to record and graph live temperature data from up to four locations on an image. This will allow them to compare the temperature data between different locations during an experiment. Furthermore, each picture taken with this device will also simultaneously take a standard picture, providing greater detail of the image.”

To help teachers utilize the Thermal Analysis app with the FLIR ONE camera, Vernier created a variety of science investigations that teachers can access on the Thermal Analysis app page. They include

  • Investigating the transmission and reflection characteristics of infrared light as compared to visible and ultraviolet light by observing a person through a variety of materials
  • Studying the thermal conductivity in solids using various materials of similar thickness, such as wood, cardboard, ceramic, steel, and glass
  • Creating a visual representation of thermal equilibration using a combination of petri dishes filled with warm and cool water
  • Investigating evaporative cooling by observing the surface of a cup of various liquids
  • Analyzing heats of solutions using various solids dissolved in water
  • Exploring the effect of vascularity on skin temperature recovery after brief exposure to ice
  • Comparing reptile skin temperatures under a heating lamp and in the shade

Read the complete review of Thermal Analysis for FLIR ONE app on the NSTA Blog »

NSTA Blog Review: Pressure Sensor 400

The new Vernier Pressure Sensor 400 is one small step up in price, but one giant leap in performance. With an exceptional operational temperature range, and secure metal fittings makes the Vernier Pressure Sensor 400 is a serious tool for high school and college experiments in chemistry, biology, physics, and environmental science.

Read the full review at NSTA Blog

Go Wireless® Heart Rate Reviewed by Tech & Learning Magazine


Students Using Labquest 2 and iPad with Go Wireless Heart Rate
Tech & Learning calls the Go Wireless Heart Rate “very powerful as a teaching tool.”

Frank Pileiro, technology director at Linwood Public Schools in Pennsylvania, wrote a review of Go Wireless Heart Rate for Tech & Learning.

“The Go Wireless Heart Rate Monitor is a nice device that can be used in a variety of educational settings, from science class to physical education and sports training.”

Pileiro tested Go Wireless Heart Rate for quality and effectiveness, ease of use, and suitability for use in a school environment.

“The accompanying app is very easy to use and allows data points to be studied and compared. … Plus, the ability to export the information in a variety of ways gives students and teachers flexibility and collaboration capabilities.”

Read the full review for Go Wireless Heart Rate »

NSTA Blog: Vernier Motion Encoder System “Raises The Bar”

“While it would be easy to dismiss all the good science taught with primitive methods, instead the simplicity, accuracy and operational speed of Vernier’s Motion Encoder System provides students not only a crystal clear insight into the nuts and bolts of motion, but also raises the bar on the subtitles and nuances of motion through actual hands-on experimentation and, if you will, science play.”

Read the NSTA blog review »

Go Wireless Temp Receives “A+” From Scholastic Tech Tools Review

The probe’s output agreed to within a tenth of a degree with three thermometers and should be accurate enough for high-school students to use to build their own calorimeters in a chemistry or physics class while remaining easy enough for first graders to use to explore temperature.

Source: Scholastic Tech Tools Blog

NSTA Reviews Optical DO Probe

But what if dissolved oxygen could be measured as easily as we measure temperature complete with auto-detection of the sensor and no calibration necessary? Not only would we take more DO measurements in more places, but we would also greatly expand our field of study both figuratively and literally!

Now just such a probe is now available! Vernier Technology has an Optical Dissolved Oxygen sensor that uses a luminescence-based optical oxygen sensor that makes taking DO measurements so easy that students can venture into previously uncharted territory to collect data.

Read the full review at NSTA Blog »

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