Your absorbance is much too high if it is at or above 1.0. You need to dilute your sample. The linear absorbance range of most spectrometers is between 0.1 and 1.

Remember that absorbance is the logarithm of the transmission (T) of light through a sample. Transmission is the ratio of the intensity of light transmitted through the sample (I) to the intensity of light transmitted through a blank (Io). So absorbance = log (Io/I).

At an absorbance of 2 you are at 1%T, which means that 99% of available light is being blocked (absorbed) by the sample. At an ABS of 3 you are at 0.1% T, which means that 99.9% of the available light is being blocked (absorbed) by the sample. These ranges are outside the meaningful range of most spectrometers.

For our array spectrometers and colorimeters the useful absorbance range is from 0.1 to 1. Any absorbance reading above 1 can be inaccurate.

There are spectrometers that will report meaningful values at absorbance ranges above 1.0, but these are research instruments that are also quite expensive. In most classroom settings, simply dilute your samples.