Vernier Software and Technology
Vernier Software & Technology

Periodic Elements: College Chemistry Blog

SDS vs. MSDS

Dr. Elaine Nam holding up MSDS and SDS papers

What is an SDS?

A Safety Data Sheet (SDS) serves the same purpose as a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). They provide a formal and consistent format, in 16 sections, that are organized in a specific order to make them easy for people to understand. The SDS also follows the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS).

What is the difference between an MSDS and SDS?

While the MSDS came in multiple forms, the SDS is presented in one format. Many MSDS components can be found in an SDS. New sections and types of information have been added to make SDS more useful. To be categorized as a Safety Data Sheet, it must include all 16 of the required sections and conform to the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). That format consists of a specific order and set of headlines. The OSHA® QuickCard lists the 16 sections.

What is GHS?

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS) is a set of international guidelines developed by the United Nations. These guidelines were created to ensure the safe manufacturing, handling, use, disposal, and transport of hazardous materials. Their goals are

  1. Define health, physical, and environmental hazards of chemicals.
  2. Create classification processes that use available data on chemicals for comparison with the defined hazard criteria.
  3. Communicate hazard information, as well as protective measures, on labels and Safety Data Sheets (SDS).

Does Vernier provide an SDS?

Yes. An SDS is provided for each chemical that we ship. In 2015, Vernier adopted the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). All of our MSDS have been updated to an SDS. The Safety Data Sheet for chemicals and solutions sold by Vernier can be found on each product’s web page and in our Product Manuals and Reference Guides.

Go to top