Weather, Climate, and Water Cycling: Vernier Supplement to OpenSciEd Unit 6.3

Weather, Climate, and Water Cycling: Vernier Supplement to OpenSciEd Unit 6.3

Weather, Climate, and Water Cycling: Vernier Supplement to OpenSciEd Unit 6.3

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Students explain small-scale storms by exploring hailstorms from different locations across the country at different times of the year. Students explore mesoscale weather systems and climate-level patterns of precipitation through analysis of weather reports of winter storms.

The Vernier Supplement to Unit 6.3 is a complement to the OpenSciEd curriculum and includes data-collection technology enhanced lessons to supplement the existing curriculum.

 

ORDER CODE: OSE-63WC-E Categories ,

Requirements

Our partnership with OpenSciEd gives middle school teachers access to free high-quality instructional materials that integrate our data-collection technology and align with the Next Generation Science Standards.

Follow the steps below to access your free PDFs and editable Google Docs for each lesson.

  1. Download the complete unit from OpenSciEd.
  2. Add the Weather, Climate and Water Cycling Supplement to your Vernier shopping cart.
  3. Complete the order. You will receive an email with a download link.
  4. Follow the link to download the Weather, Climate and Water Cycling Supplement.
  5. Swap in the enhanced data-collection lessons for the OpenSciEd lessons.

Lessons

There are 22 lessons in the full OpenSciEd Unit 6.3.

3 lessons are enhanced with Vernier data-collection technology—included in the Vernier Supplement to Weather, Climate and Water Cycling.

This unit uses Vernier Graphical Analysis™, two Go Direct® Temperature Probes per group, a Go Direct® Weather System, and a Go Direct® Light and Color Sensor.

Lessons Sensors Used
Lesson 1: What causes this kind of precipitation event to occur?
Lesson 2: What are the conditions like on days when it hails?
Lesson 3: How does the air higher up compare to the air near the ground?
Lesson 4: Why is the air near the ground warmer than the air higher up? Go Direct®
Temperature Probe
(1 per group)
Go Direct® Light and Color Sensor (1 per group)
Go Direct® Weather System (1 per group)
Lesson 5: What happens to the air near the ground when it is warmed up?
Lesson 6: How can we explain the movement of air in a hail cloud?
Lesson 7:  Where did all that water in the air come from, and how did it get into the air? Go Direct®
Temperature Probe
(2 per group)
Go Direct® Light and Color Sensor (1 per group)
Go Direct® Weather System (1 per group)
Lesson 8: What happens to water vapor in the air if we cool the air down, and why?
Lesson 9: Why don’t we see clouds everywhere in the air, and what is a cloud made of?
Lesson 10: Why do clouds or storms form at some times but not others?
Lesson 11: Why don’t water droplets or ice crystals fall from the clouds all the time?
Lesson 12:  What causes more lift in one cloud versus another? Go Direct®
Temperature Probe
(2 per group)
Go Direct® Light and Color Sensor (1 per group)
Go Direct® Weather System (1 per group)
Lesson 13: Why do some storms produce (really big) hail and others don’t?
Lesson 14: What causes a large-scale precipitation event like this to occur?
Lesson 15: What happens with temperature and humidity of air in large storms?
Lesson 16: How do warm air masses and cold air masses interact along the boundaries between them?
Lesson 17: Is there a relationship between where the air is rising and where precipitation falls?
Lesson 18: How can we explain what is happening across this storm (and other large-scale storms)?
Lesson 19: Are there patterns to how air masses move that can help predict where large storms will form?
Lesson 20: How do oceans affect whether a place gets a lot or a little precipitation?
Lesson 21: Why is there less precipitation further inland in the Pacific Northwest than further inland from the Gulf Coast?
Lesson 22: How can we explain differences in climate in different parts of the world?

 

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Educational use only: Vernier products are designed for educational use. They are not appropriate for industrial, medical, or commercial applications.

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